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"Back to BASICS" Video #2: All about EGGS!

Updated: Aug 25


Oh, the incredible, edible egg!! I just love them!! And I feel really bad for anyone who has a food allergy to eggs. Sooooo sad!!! They are close to being the perfect food! Think about it for a moment: they are self-contained, small but packed with protein, readily available and inexpensive, they have a considerable shelf-life, you can cook them a ton of different ways, and they are delicious! That's a lot of pro's in their favor for sure! And I didn't even go into their pharmaceutical uses in research! Sheesh!! The list just keeps growing! It all boils down to one thing: eggs are important. I'm happy to being this video to you because cooking an egg can be daunting to some people and the fear is unnecessary!! You just have to know a tried and true method and you're set for success. Personally, I love a soft scrambled egg. It's my egg of choice, followed by an over-medium egg. I like my eggs partially done I suppose, or even 'under done' as some would say. It is what it is and I like them the way I like them. And I'm sure the same applies to you! Just take a look at all these wonderful ways to cook an egg!! And be sure to watch the tutorial video below because I went off the beaten path, so to speak, and you can watch me cook up a DUCK EGG! Quack! LOL Be sure to leave me a comment and tell me how you like YOUR eggs!


Chickens lay a variety of different colored eggs. The reasoning is basically genetics. Different breeds of birds lay different types/colors of eggs. You can compare it to humans and hair color. The same can be said for ducks. Some duck eggs are white while others may tends to be bluish-green. Mother Nature likes variety!!!

Size is another factor that has to do with bird, breed, age, living conditions, and nutrition. Just look at the the chicken eggs compared to the duck eggs! Chickens are generally smaller than ducks so it makes sense that their eggs would be smaller, too.

Different ways to cook an egg:

Cooking times for eggs:

  • Boiled eggs: Fill a pan with cold water, add 1/4 tsp salt and add the eggs. Bring water to a rolling boil. Place the lid on the pan and remove from the heat. For a soft boiled eggs, let them sit for 6 to 8 minutes. The yolk is still soft and the white has set up but it is not very firm. For hard boiled eggs, let them sit for 12 to 15 minutes. Both the yolk and the white have set up very firmly. Dump the eggs into ice an bath to stop the cooking process and peel.

  • Sunnyside egg: Heat a pan on medium-low until hot. Add oil & butter. Crack 1 egg into the pan and let it cook until the white is set to your liking. The yolk is still basically raw on the exposed side.

  • Over-light: Heat a pan on medium-low until hot. Add oil & butter. Crack 1 egg into the pan and let it cook for 1 minute. Flip egg and let it cook for another 15 seconds. Remove from heat and serve. The white of the egg is just cooked but not hard set and the yolk is runny and barely warmed.

  • Over-medium: Heat a pan on medium-low until hot. Add oil & butter. Crack 1 egg into the pan and let it cook for 1 minute. Flip egg and let it cook for another 30 to 40 seconds. Remove from heat and serve. The white of the egg is cooked solid and the yolk is warm and runny.

  • Well done: Heat a pan on medium-low until hot. Add oil & butter. Crack 1 egg into the pan, break the yolk and let it cook for 1 minute. Flip the egg and let it cook for an additional minute. It should be good and done by this point but if you're rabid about cooking it until it is graveyard dead, then cook it until it looks good to you. Remove from heat and serve. All parts of the egg are completely cooked and the texture is a bit dry due to the removal of a majority of the moisture.

  • Scrambled: Heat a pan on medium-low until hot. Add oil & butter. Crack your eggs into a bowl and mix well in fast, circular motion with a fork or use a whisk until the yolks and whites are completely blended and a bit frothy. Pour the eggs into the hot pan and let them sit for a moment. Begin to move a plastic spatula through the egg mixture, breaking apart the smooth surface and allowing the liquid components to be in contact with the pan through the cooking process. A soft scramble takes just a few moments and you will notice the eggs are creamy and still hold together well. A hard scramble takes more time, with constant stirring to mix up the eggs so any raw portion gets direct contact with the hot pan, getting rid of a lot of the moisture and leaving you with small solid chunks that do not stick together and are almost rubbery in texture.

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Tutorial video:

Thanks so much for stopping by. I invite you to take a look around at my other blog entries--you might find something fabulous. Please subscribe to my blog, too--it's free! Leave a comment or a suggestion--I really love hearing from you! Jamie ♥

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